Apple today announced its results for the fourth calendar quarter of 2009 (Apple's first fiscal quarter). As always, a lot of interesting info:

The Company posted revenue of $15.68 billion and a net quarterly profit of $3.38 billion, or $3.67 per diluted share. These results compare to revenue of $11.88 billion and net quarterly profit of $2.26 billion, or $2.50 per diluted share, in the year-ago quarter. Gross margin was 40.9 percent, up from 37.9 percent in the year-ago quarter. International sales accounted for 58 percent of the quarter’s revenue.

Apple sold 3.36 million Macintosh computers during the quarter, representing a 33 percent unit increase over the year-ago quarter.

This means, by the way, that the Mac accounted for 3.82 percent of the worldwide PC market in Q4 2009. I will have to research this, but I believe that's a new high since Steve Jobs returned to the company.

The Company sold 8.7 million iPhones in the quarter, representing 100 percent unit growth over the year-ago quarter.

Curiously, this figure disappointed analysts and could be a cause for concern for the coming iPhone-based tablet. "Maybe some on the Street were getting a little euphoric with their expectations on the iPhone," said Bill Kreher, an analyst with Edward Jones. "[This] might be perceived as a ho-hum iPhone number." Reuters called the figure "lackluster."

Apple sold 21 million iPods during the quarter, representing an eight percent unit decline from the year-ago quarter.

"We are very pleased to have generated $5.8 billion in cash during the quarter," said Peter Oppenheimer, Apple's CFO.