Although there is an option on the Windows 10 for phones technical preview to allow apps to be updated automatically, just like on Windows Phone 8.1, I have always preferred checking for updates manually.

I do that to keep an eye on what is being updated and because of the type of work I do. It is always a good thing to know what types of updates the apps on my phone receive for sharing that information with others via the SuperSite and on social media.  App updates always seem to be a hot topic.

So in Windows Phone 8.1 I have a quick process to check for updates that is built into my muscle memory.  I first tap on the Settings icon to get the entire list of settings:

Windows Phone 8.1 Settings Menu

Then I swipe over, also know as a pivot, from the right to show the applications specific settings and then tap on store.

Windows Phone 8.1 Applications Menu

That tap initiates the app update check and I can then return to my Start Screen to see if any updates are available by looking at the Windows Phone Store live tile.

Quick, easy and well ingrained in my fingers and memory.

In the Windows 10 for phones technical preview, at least in this first public build, the pivot to application specific settings is no longer available from the settings page.

Windows 10 for phones Settings Menu

As you can see from the above list there is also no option for diving straight into the store settings to check for updates.

That means in order to check for app updates in Windows 10 for phones you must actually open the Windows Store app, tap the ellipsis menu at the bottom of the screen and then tap settings.

Windows 10 for phones Store Settings Menu

Now you can tap check for updates and then take a look at the Windows Store live tile on your Start Screen to see if there are any app updates.

So for comparison the Windows Phone 8.1 method takes six steps and the process on Windows 10 for phones also just takes six steps.

So if it is the same number of steps why does it feel so weird to check it in a different way?

Muscle memory. Our bodies, hands, eyes and mind all get used to performing certain actions in a specific manner and any disruption to that can really throw things off.

Such is the challenge with Windows, whether on a desktop or phone, as there are always multiple methods to do certain things.  This is especially increased as a new version of Windows starts its development path and things get moved around and changes are introduced.

As long as you have patience with the changes soon your muscle memory will adapt and settle in to its new surroundings.

What has been the most challenging changes you have experienced in Windows 10?